Earthquake Preparedness in the Library

By Garid Faria, Administrative & Fiscal Support Specialist

San José Library after 2007 earthquakeA major earthquake is one in which one or more of the following occurs: book stacks collapse or become unstable, walls or floors crack or crumble, window glass breaks, electrical wires or ceiling tiles become exposed, power is lost, flooding occurs, building entrances are blocked and/or occupants are injured.  They are unpredictable and strike without warning.

DURING THE EARTHQUAKE

  • DROP, COVER and HOLD ON. Minimize your movements to a few steps to a nearby safe place.
  • Move away from windows, skylights, suspended light fixtures or objects to avoid falling glass/objects.
  • Beware of collapsing book shelves and falling objects.
  • Take cover under a sturdy table or desk.

IF INDOORS

  • DROP to your hands and knees.
  • COVER your head and neck with your arms. This position protects you from falling and provides some protection for vital organs. Because moving can put you in danger from the debris in your path, only move if you need to get away from the danger of falling objects. If you can move safely, crawl for additional cover under a sturdy desk or table. If there is low furniture, or an interior wall or corner nearby and the path is clear, these may also provide some additional cover.
  • HOLD ON to any sturdy shelter until the shaking stops.
  • Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as lighting fixtures or furniture.
  • At night, hazards and debris are difficult to see and avoid; therefore, attempt to move in the dark with caution to prevent injury.
  • DO NOT get in a doorway as this does not provide protection from falling or flying objects and you likely will not be able to remain standing if the tremors are severe.
  • Stay inside until the shaking stops and it is safe to go outside. Do not exit a building during the shaking. Research has shown that most injuries occur when people inside buildings attempt to move to a different location inside the building or try to leave.
  • Be aware that the electricity may go out or the sprinkler systems or fire alarms may turn on.

IF OUTDOORS

  • If you can, move away from buildings, streetlights, and utility wires.
  • Once in the open, DROP, COVER, and HOLD ON.
  • STAY THERE until the shaking stops. Depending on the situation, you may need to duck inside a building to avoid falling debris.

AFTER THE TREMORS END

  • When the shaking stops, look around to make sure it is safe to move and there is a safe way out through the debris. Then exit the building.
  • Expect aftershocks and be prepared. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake but can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures and can occur in the first hours, days, weeks, or even months after the quake. DROP, COVER, and HOLD ON whenever you feel shaking.
  • As you exit, PULL THE FIRE ALARM AND EVACUATE to the designated Gathering Area away from buildings/large trees. Staff assembles and conducts a head count to ensure all staff are accounted for.
  • Move injured to a safe area and render first aid as needed.
  • DO NOT BLINDLY RUN OUTSIDE as parts of the building may still be falling.
  • Avoid coming in contact or getting near fallen electrical lines.
  • Beware of fire as it is the most common hazard after an earthquake.

AFTER EXITING THE BUILDING

  • DO NOT RETURN to any building for any reason until the building is declared safe.
  • Call DPS at 6-6911 to report damage and request minor medical assistance OR call Emergency Services directly at 911 for a major emergency (police, fire/rescue, ambulance).
  • If telephones are not working, communicate with authorities in person or via email/text message.

Preservation of Jon Van Dyke’s Papers Underway at Law Library

 

The William S. Richardson School of Law Library received a grant from the Hawai’i Council for Humanities to process the papers of the late Professor of Law, Jon Van Dyke.  Van Dyke was a leader in ocean, indigenous, human rights, and environmental law.

The grant will focus on processing, indexing, and making accessible the papers and research behind Van Dyke’s book Who Owns the Crown Lands of Hawai’i?; his participation in the Ferdinand Marcos Human Rights Litigation case with his partner Sherry Broder; and his participation in various Pacific Island judiciary developments advocating for islander rights in Ocean Law, anti-nuclear issues, and self-governance, among other issues.

Archival processing will be coordinated by Archives Manager, Ellen-Rae Cachola, under the supervision of Library Director, Vicki Szymczak.  The archival processing program will engage students to learn about Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island history through hands-on archival preservation experiences.

A public event launching the Jon Van Dyke Collection will be in late February 2018. Please look out for the announcement in the coming year.

“Lexis Mania” Week (April 3-6)

Our new Lexis representative (welcome, Camden DeLong) will be visiting the law school April 3-6. While here, he will be conducting very useful and informative trainings. Students are encouraged to attend these programs as we rarely have visits from our Lexis rep. Please note the session on Apr 5 at 5:15 PM about Practice Pages: this session is perfect for SYS or Moot Court students.

Lexis points and food will be available at these sessions. Please RSVP at www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool.

Schedule:

Mon Apr 3  5:15-6:25: Lexis Refresher/Terms & Connectors Training & How to Shepardize + Advanced Shepardizing (Library 118)
Tues Apr 4 11:30-12:30: Lexis Refresher/Terms & Connectors Training (CR3)
5:15-6:25: How to use Lexis for interview purposes (CR3)
Wed Apr 5 11:30-12:30: Professional Research Certification (Library 120)
5:15-6:25: Practice Pages (very helpful for 2L/3L, especially for SYS or moot court) (Library 118)
Th Apr 6 11:30-12:30: How to Shepardize + Advanced Shepardizing (Library 118)

Thanks for your time and participation. It is very important for law students to be well-versed in all of the research opportunities and tools.

The Law Library Wants to Hear From You!

The Library Faculty and Staff will be conducting surveys of our services the week of March 19th!  What is involved?  Ten minutes of your time in exchange for a cup of joe or tea.  Here is the schedule.  Please come by and take our survey, even if you don’t want coffee or tea!

Mon, 3/20 12:30-1:30
Mon, 3/20 3:30-4:30
Tues, 3/21 9-10
Tues, 3/21 12:30-1:30
Tues, 3/21 4:30-5:30
Wed, 3/22 3-4
Thurs, 3/22 5-6

“Boundaries” Art Show April 7th

Friday, April 7, 2017 marks the opening of the William S. Richardson School of Law Library’s 2nd Art Show. This year’s exhibition is titled “Boundaries,” and will feature artistic interpretations on the theme in a variety of media.

The library’s first event was held in 2015, and focused on themes of social justice. As with the last show, this event will feature submissions from faculty, staff, and students, in addition to alumni and the extended law school ʻohana. “Boundaries” is a product of the collaborative efforts of the law library’s art committee, led by committee chair and reference librarian Roberta Woods, and builds upon the excellent rotating selection of works already installed in the library by the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts: Art in Public Places lending collection. The art committee hopes that the added works submitted by law school ʻohana will serve as a platform to discuss contemporary issues in law and justice through the lens of artistic expression.

A special reception will be held in the lobby of the library from 5pm to 8:30pm to commemorate the opening, and will feature refreshments for attendees, a program of artists’ biographies, and a performance by the Pacific Tongues, a nonprofit organization and community of spoken word artists. Following the opening reception, the “Boundaries” exhibit will remain on display to the public during regular library hours through May 14th.

UC Berkeley School of Law Library Begins Permanently Archiving US Supreme Court Decisions

US Supreme Court sealLink rot has plagued the hallowed halls of the Supreme Court. The UC Berkeley School of Law Library has partnered with application developer Philip Ardery to address this problem by hosting U.S. Supreme Court Web Citations, a web service that captures snapshots of any web resource cited by the United States Supreme Court immediately after their opinions are issued.  The goal of the service is to leverage current web and archiving technologies to minimize the link rot that complicates research as websites change or become unavailable over time.

When a judicial opinion cites something from the web, researchers should be able to check it later and find exactly what it looked like when it was cited.1

This is a stopgap initiative until the Court implements a permanent solution. At present there are 612 decisions archived in PDF format on the site.


1. http://scotus.law.berkeley.edu, archived at https://perma.cc/Z7BV-CJNY

Author Book Talk: Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move

Author book talkSecond Law Library Book Talk Series

Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move
by Reece Jones, Associate Professor, Graduate Chair,
Department of Geography University of Hawai‘i at Manoa

—Boston Globe Recommended Book for Fall 2016—

When: Monday, March 13, 2017, 11:45am-1pm
Where: William S. Richardson School of Law Library Lobby
* Light refreshments will be served on a first come, first served basis.
Your RSVP by March 9th will be greatly appreciated.

The focus of this book is on how borders are formed and policed to understand the world’s current migration crises and a deep analysis of the changing role and impact of the border, as well as how border regimes sustain global injustice. Forty thousand people died trying to cross international borders in the past decade. According to the author these deaths are not exceptional, but rather the result of state attempts to contain populations and control access to resources and opportunities. While globalization is prevailing, limiting the free movement of people is reality. With the growth of borders and resource enclosures, the deaths of migrants in search of a better life are intimately connected to climate change, environmental degradation, and the growth of global wealth inequality.

More information on the book can be found at http://www2.hawaii.edu/~reecej/violent%20borders.html