“Lexis Mania” Week (April 3-6)

Our new Lexis representative (welcome, Camden DeLong) will be visiting the law school April 3-6. While here, he will be conducting very useful and informative trainings. Students are encouraged to attend these programs as we rarely have visits from our Lexis rep. Please note the session on Apr 5 at 5:15 PM about Practice Pages: this session is perfect for SYS or Moot Court students.

Lexis points and food will be available at these sessions. Please RSVP at www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool.

Schedule:

Mon Apr 3  5:15-6:25: Lexis Refresher/Terms & Connectors Training & How to Shepardize + Advanced Shepardizing (Library 118)
Tues Apr 4 11:30-12:30: Lexis Refresher/Terms & Connectors Training (CR3)
5:15-6:25: How to use Lexis for interview purposes (CR3)
Wed Apr 5 11:30-12:30: Professional Research Certification (Library 120)
5:15-6:25: Practice Pages (very helpful for 2L/3L, especially for SYS or moot court) (Library 118)
Th Apr 6 11:30-12:30: How to Shepardize + Advanced Shepardizing (Library 118)

Thanks for your time and participation. It is very important for law students to be well-versed in all of the research opportunities and tools.

New Legal History Database

By Catherine Bye, Technical Services/Acquisitions Librarian

HeinOnline’s History of International Law contains over 1,400 titles dating as far back as 1602.  This set covers classic international law subjects including the origins of international arbitration, war and peace (no, not Tolstoy’s War and Peace), the Nuremberg Trials, preparatory documents related to the conclusion of the Hague conferences and conventions, and the Law of the Sea.  For example, it includes a 1613 title Abridgement of All Sea-Lawes; Gathered Forth of all writings and monuments which are to be found amoung any people or Nation vpon the Coafts of the Great Ocean and Mediterranean Sea published in 1612 is an early English treatise on the origins of the Law of the Sea.

This collection also contains historical documentation related to the Hague Conferences and Conventions and several treatises on the origins of democracy and foreign relations.  You will be surprised by the breadth of this set.  It includes classics such as H.G. Wells’ The Fourth Year discussing the issues of post-World War I politics and establishing lasting peace in regard to the League of Nations (yes, he is known for science fiction but he also wrote extensively on non-fiction subjects) to treatises on compulsory arbitration of international disputes.

For first hand exploration, visit http://heinonline.org/HOL/Index?collection=hoil&set_as_cursor=clear